Dell told to drop the toxicsPhoto: Greenpeace activists protest outside Dell offices for failing to fulfill their promise to phase out Toxic material from their products.

Greenpeace is targeting Dell for continuing to use PVC vinyl plastic and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in all its computers, despite promising to eliminate these toxic substances. The giant PC maker committed publicly to be off these chemicals by the end of 2009. Well the deadline has passed and anyone buying a Dell computer will be sadly disappointed by what is in the box, says Greenpeace. 29 March Greenpeace activists unfurled banners at Dell's offices in Amsterdam, Bangalore and Copenhagen

Dell told to drop the toxicsPhoto: Greenpeace activists protest outside Dell offices for failing to fulfill their promise to phase out Toxic material from their products.

Dell continues to use  PVC vinyl plastic and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in all its computers, despite promising to eliminate these toxic substances. The giant PC maker committed publicly to be off these chemicals by the end of 2009. Well the deadline has passed and anyone buying a Dell computer will be sadly disappointed by what is in the box, says Greenpeace. 29 March Greenpeace activists unfurled banners at Dell's offices in Amsterdam, Bangalore and Copenhagen.

During production, use and disposal, PVC is the single most environmentally damaging of all plastics, and can form dioxin, a known carcinogen, when burnt during sub-standard recycling practices.
BFRs which are highly resistant to degradation in the environment and are able to bio-accumulate (build up in animals and humans), can be released from products during use and can also form dioxins when burnt during the type of basic recycling practices commonly used in Asia and Africa. 


Dell isn't the only tech company in our Guide to Greener Electronics to have broken its public commitment to clean up. But for a company that aspires to be "the greenest technology company on the planet" Dell's lack of leadership in launching products free of PVC and BFRs is especially hypocritical and disappointing for customers.

Greenpeace also want the companies, including Dell, to take a proactive position to ensure that their commitments for PVC and BFR elimination end up in the European Union's RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics) Directive.

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