Photo: Greenpeace - The e-waste tragedy

The film ‘The e-waste tragedy’ (and 6 other films) can be viewed for free online until the 29th of October. Vote for your favourite film! Is The e-waste tragedy going to be the winner of the People’s Award as part of the online Greenpeace Filmfestival?

Photo: Greenpeace - The e-waste tragedy

From October 16 through 29: seven films Internet users selected will be available via streaming for free and voting will be open. The film that will have gathered the most votes will win the “People’s award” and will be shown in about 10 theaters in various French towns in the ensuing months.

Why watch The e-waste tragedy?

Every year, up to 50 million tons of electronic waste – computers, television sets, mobile phones, household appliances – are discarded in the developed world. 75% of this waste disappears from the legal recycling circuits, with much of it being shipped illegally to India, China or Africa.

Illegal recycling and waste dumping is a multi-million dollar business, polluting the environment and destroying the lives and health of those forced to live with it.

This film takes the viewer on a breathtaking journey of investigation to Europe, China, Africa and the US. It reveals how the European recycling system, plagued by lack of controls, greed and corruption, leaks like a sieve to shady international exporters; how harbour officials in Europe and Asia are fighting a losing battle against the immense volume of e-waste crossing the oceans; why the US are the biggest exporter in the world; and how whole cities in China are literally drowning in our discarded appliances, where they are recycled with a total disregard for the environment or the future.

As a result, recycled and damaged computer chips are creeping into the production lines of electronics that control key aspects of our lives, such as public transport, creating a huge security risk in the process.

Can the toxic tide be stemmed, or are too many people willingly turning a blind eye?

Watch and vote for The e-waste tragedy here (until 29th of October 2017).