Photo: SACOM’s video Apple: Student Interns or Disposable Labour?

A new investigative report disclosing Apple’s interns abuses will be published by SACOM soon. To demand Apple Inc. to stop abusing students and end labour informalization, please like and share SACOM’s animation and join the campaign #iSlaveat10.

Photo: SACOM’s video Apple: Student Interns or Disposable Labour?

In recent years, the term “Empowering Workers” has always been found in Apple Inc.’s Supplier Responsibility Progress Report. Two examples:

“Every workday should include opportunity and enrichment.” (Apple’s Supplier Responsibility 2017 Progress Report)

“It’s more about than jobs. It’s about opportunities.” (Apple’s Supplier Responsibility 2016 Progress Report)

However, what is the truth about Apple’s supply chain? Is Apple really providing learning opportunities to its employees? This animation produced by Students and Scholars Against Corporate Misbehaviour (SACOM) disclosed the fact that interns are widely used by Apple’s Chinese suppliers as cheap and disposable labour. These interns who are having totally irrelevant majors, such as pharmacy, accounting and early education, were sent to the factories to perform repetitive tasks just like a regular worker. While they are not provided with any actual learning opportunity, they are also not having full workers’ rights as they are not regarded as a formal worker.

What can you do?

To demand Apple Inc. to stop abusing students and end labour informalization, please like and share the animation. Watch SACOM’s video Apple: Student Interns or Disposable Labour?*

We also would like to ask you to take a photo or make a video and tell Apple to stop labour rights violation. Upload the photo or video to Facebook/Twitter, please tag #SACOM #iSlaveat10. SACOM will start the next round of anti-sweatshop campaign by gathering your voices and demands! Each photo matters!

*This video received support from GoodElectronics, Bread for All and the European Union. The content of this video is the sole responsibility of SACOM (or the author) and does not necessarily reflect the position of the EU.